Hana Kim, Ph.D.



Hana Kim is a postdoctoral research fellow in the S.C.O.R.E lab. Currently, she focuses on longitudinal behavioral and neurological changes in individuals with aphasia following left-hemisphere stroke, using fNIRS.

Hana received her B.A. in Political Science and M.A. in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Ewha Womans University, Seoul in Korea. In 2015, she came to the US to pursue a Ph.D. at East Carolina University, studying under Dr. Heather Harris Wright, and graduated in 2020.


Research

  • Cognitive ability and social support that affect discourse processing and language recovery in adults with acquired neurogenic communication disorders
  • Measurement of discourse performance
  • Brain-behavior relationships in language in adults with acquired neurogenic communication disorders

Publications

Kim, H., Kintz, S., & Wright, H. H. (in press). Development of a measure of function word use in narrative discourse: core lexicon analysis in aphasia. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.
Kim, H., & Wright, H. H. (2020). A tutorial on core lexicon: Development, use and application. Seminars in speech and language. 41(1), 20-31.
Dalton, S. G. H., Kim, H., Richardson, J.D., & Wright, H. H. (2020). A compendium of core lexicon checklists. Seminars in speech and language. 41(1), 45-60.
Kim, H., & Wright, H. H. (2020). Concurrent validity and reliability of the core lexicon measure as a measure of word retrieval ability in aphasia narratives. American Journal of Speech- Language Pathology. 29(10), 101-110.
Kim, H., Kintz, S., & Wright, H. H. (2019). Measuring word retrieval in narrative discourse: Core lexicon in Aphasia. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 54(1), 68-78.
Henderson, A., Kim, H., Kintz, S., Frisco, N., & Wright, H. H. (2017). Working memory in Aphasia: Considering discourse processing and treatment implications. Seminars in speech and language, 38(1), 40-51.
Kim, H., & Sung, J. E (2014). Age-related changes in story retelling procedures and their relation to working memory capacity, Special Education Research, 13(3), 7-24.